News

  • 13 Mar 2019 10:24 AM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)


    Ahead of Japan hosting the Paralympics in 2020, On 5 March 2019, the ANZCCJ held a Sports for Business (SFB) meeting with special guest, Paralympic wheelchair runner, Jun Hiromichi. The SFB committee members and guest attendees were able to enjoy an inspiring talk and discussion with the sportsman. Jun participates in mainly category T53 wheelchair racing events and has been competing in Paralympic sporting for 28 years.

    Jun’s story began at the age of 15, when he was involved in a motorcycle accident that left him paralysed and unable to walk again. Despite being faced with new challenges, Jun said that he was able to maintain a positive mindset. He was lucky to have survived the accident and this, in Jun’s perspective, was another chance to live, and another opportunity to become a better person.

    At the time of the accident, there was very limited information and representation of paraplegic sports in Japan. Most people believed that individuals with disabilities were not capable of doing anything, and this contributed greatly to the stigma and underrepresentation of the minority. However, Jun became aware of other paraplegic athletes at the age of 17 and was inspired to become a racer. Only one and a half years after the accident, in 1994 at the Boston Marathon, Jun competed in his first race. This made Jun the first professional wheelchair runner in Japan.

    Jun gained a strong motivation to learn English and to become a top athlete after meeting the world champion at that time, Jim Knaub, from California. Jim went on to become Jun’s mentor and was able to share his experiences as how to improve his technique and seek sponsorships. This help, and Jun’s own determination, enabled him to compete in the Sydney 2000, Athens 2004, Beijing 2008 and London 2012 Summer Paralympics, winning a silver medal in Sydney and a bronze medal in Athens, and placing 7th in London – all in the 800m race. On top of this, Jun won bronze in 2002 at the World Championships in Lille, France.

    Racing bike chairs are handmade, with the main frame and wheel cases being made of carbon fibre. The typical cost ranges between US$6000-8000, depending on the quality of the frame you choose. Often athletes and their families are left to self-fund their travel and equipment, with only a small number of companies willing to sponsor. The number of sponsors for paraplegic athletes is significantly lower than that of other athletes. With respect to sponsorship surrounding Paralympic athletes, Jun said that because Paralympians do not receive as much broadcasting coverage of its athletes, the advertising benefits and exposure to sponsors was limited, especially compared with major sports and tournaments like the Olympics. This is an issue in the industry, but often Corporate Social Responsibility-initiatives are the motive behind some companies who decide to sponsor Paralympic athletes. Jun’s main sponsor is Puma Japan, but he is also supported by Nippon Rent A Car, Mandom and OGK KABUTO.

    In addition to his sporting achievements, Jun has won a number of awards within Japan -including the Oita Prefectural Medal and the Prime Minister’s Award for his participation in the local community. Jun holds various lectures, talk shows, coaching clinics, and is an active guest commentator on radio and TOS TV Oita with OBS Oita Broadcasting. Prior to this, Jun has served as a council committee member of the Japan Para Athletics Federation. He has also worked as the director of the Paralympians Association of Japan and executive director of Sports of Heart. It is brilliant to see such a great sportsman representing minority groups in Japan.

    A copy of the minutes from the SFB meeting – for ANZCCJ members- can be found online here.



  • 07 Mar 2019 12:00 PM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)


    On 7 March, His Excellency the Honourable Hieu Van Le AC, Governor of South Australia; Hon. David Ridgway MLC, Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment; Mr Kazuyoshi Matsunaga, Consul-General of Japan to VIC, TAS and SA and the Australian Ambassador to Japan, HE Richard Court AC, opened the South Australian trade & investment office. Later that day, Commissioner, South Australia - Japan and Korea was announced, which we were delighted to hear would be our very own Chair, Sally Townsend. The new office will be co-located in the Australian Embassy alongside Austrade.  The office will cover the North East Asia Region – including Korea – which accounts for more than $1.07 billion a year in SA exports. Minister Ridgway said the office was the second to be opened by the Marshall Government as part of its $12.8 million investment, following the establishment of the Shanghai, China, office in November last year. The official press release can be found onlinehere. An official reception was hosted at Happo-en to mark the occasion. Guests were treated to a beautiful 3-course meal matched perfectly with South Australian wine, a sake barrel breaking ceremony, as well as a tuna carving demonstration and when it came time to leave, guests were given a goodie bag of South Australian treats including Haigh’s chocolate and Penfolds wine. Guests included Japan Chamber of Commerce and Industry Chair and Tokyo Chamber of Commerce and Industry Chair, Dr Akio Mimura, and Australian Ambassador to Japan, HE Richard Court AC, as well as representatives from the SA sister prefecture, Okayama, and a large contingent of Tokyo and South Australian business representatives ANZCCJ’s Executive Council together with some industry representatives met with South Australian government and business representatives on 7 March ahead of the official opening of South Australia’s trade office in Tokyo later that day. As part of the lunch meeting, which was hosted at the Park Hyatt, we met with South Australian Governor HE the Hon. Hieu Van Le; Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment Hon. David Ridgway MLC; Consul-General of Japan to VIC, TAS and SA, Kazuyoshi Matsunaga; Deputy Chief Executive, Department for Trade, Tourism and Investment (DTTI), Megan Antcliff; CEO, Food SA, Catherine Sayer; CEO, Australian Southern Bluefin Tuna Industry Association, Brian Jeffriess AM; CEO, 

    AusVeg SA, Jordan Brooke-Barnett; Chair, AusVeg SA, Kingsley Songer; Director, Low Carbon Economy Unit, Department for Energy and Mining, Richard Day; Official Secretary to the Governor of SA, Mr Hugh Borrowman; and Chief of Staff to Minister Ridgway, Scott Kompo-Harms.

    The South Australian (SA) delegation enlightened us with their trade and economic priorities, including with respect to Japan and their plans to diversify SA’s offerings to the international market. What stood out from the meeting was the overwhelming sense that SA had a strong story to tell in Japan, for example, 80% of Australia’s wine is produced in SA, 90% of Australia’s tuna output is from SA and it hosts the world’s largest li-ion batteries, drawing large international investments from companies like Tesla and NEC. Telling this story would be an important task for the new SA office.

    Some common themes discussed at the lunch included:

    -The need to raise SA’s profile in Japan, as well as SA contributing to the over-arching Australia brand on the ground and in the regions of Japan;

    -Attracting Japanese investment into SA as a priority – and a key way to approach this will be SA looking at a range of possible investors;

    -SA considering Japanese partners as more than investment sources, but considering what know-how, and other partnerships they could potentially tap into within the investment relationship; and

    -The compelling renewable energy story in SA also needed to be shared. SA had a number of successful case studies which has put SA on the map as “the renewable energy state of Australia”. This has left further food for thought as 

    the Chamber works to change perceptions of Australian trade offerings to the Japanese market, and with renewable energies being a priority industry focus area for Australia and Japan as well as our chamber.

    A number of important points were made throughout the meeting, but a key message our chamber delivered to the SA side was that this was the right time for SA to open this office: With a number of high profile events raising Japan’s profile further within the international business community; and Japan’s efforts to open itself up further to the international community with changes in immigration rules, and greater free trade access through FTAs. We also conveyed how important this office would be in offering a gateway for SA companies to learn more about the Japanese market and tap into commercial partnership and investment opportunities here. Without a presence, relationships can’t be fully built and maintained in Japan. We are also glad to 

    see that the new Commissioner, South Australia – Japan, Korea, will be our very own Chair, Sally Townsend. The office officially opened on 7 March, with a ribbon cutting ceremony (photos below – in document), where the office will be co-located within Austrade. Sally started in the role on 18 March.


  • 28 Feb 2019 10:09 AM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)


    On Friday 15 February, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (SMBC), one of Japan’s largest banks, with a heritage of over 140 years, hosted a global seminar “Australia – Opportunity Abounds”, supported by the Australian Embassy, Austrade, NSW Trade & Investment, QLD Trade & Investment, VIC Trade & Investment, and WA Trade & Investment as well as the ANZCCJ. In attendance were over 60 people, including clients of SMBC and members of the Chamber. Key speakers included the Australian Ambassador HE Richard Court AC, Austrade Senior Trade Commissioner Brett Cooper, NSW Trade and Investment Commissioner Peter Knight, Queensland Trade and Investment Commissioner Tak Adachi, Commissioner for Victoria to Japan and Korea Adam Cunneen, Government of WA Japan Office Acting Commissioner Richelle Gornik, and Senior Managing Executive Officer at SMBC, Masahiko Oshima. 

    The seminar commenced with opening remarks by the Senior Managing Executive Officer at SMBC, Masahiko Oshima, followed by a greeting by the Australian Ambassador to Japan, Richard Court. 

    The first session commenced with an insightful presentation on the investment opportunities for Japanese enterprises in Australia by Austrade Senior Trade Commissioner, Brett Cooper. The presentation comprised of four topics: Broader Australian economic trends for 2019; direct foreign investment patterns in Australia; opportunities in Australia for Japanese enterprises, and the role Austrade plays in supporting businesses and investors. Mr Cooper emphasised that the Australian economy has been growing steadily, and will continue to do so, due to the increasing population as a result of immigration. He also mentioned that Japan has become Australia’s second biggest investor, and that there is a plethora of diverse investment opportunities aside from mining.

    Following Mr Cooper’s presentation, Australian State representatives gave presentations about the unique opportunities in their home states. The focus for these presentations was to introduce innovative business areas, such as ‘clean-tech’, energy storage, smart grid, game and creative industries, and life science/test marketing. Peter Knight, New South Wales (NSW) Trade and Investment Commissioner, representing NSW, explained that NSW plays a leading role in Australian economy and is the national hub of clean-tech, raising the opportunities for investment in energy storage and saving. Mr Cooper, on behalf of the Northern Territories (NT), discussed investment opportunities in tourism, energy, minerals and rare earth, space industry and agribusiness in NT. Tak Adachi, Queensland (QLD) Trade and Investment Commissioner, focussed on QLD’s innovation ecosystem which was budding around robotics and life sciences, bio science, renewable energy and ‘agritech’. The QLD Government has started a fund called “Advance Queensland” in the aim of supporting programs that drive innovation, build on QLD’s natural assets, and help raise QLD’s profile as an attractive investment destination. Adam Cunneen, Commissioner for Victoria (VIC) to Japan and Korea, talked about how VIC has established its economy without depending on the natural resources sector, instead focussing on clinical trials and ‘drug discovery’, information communications tech, and building a hydrogen energy supply chain derived from brown coal. Richelle Gornik, the Acting Trade and Investment Commissioner for Western Australia (WA) spoke on how WA has played an important role in Australia-Japan trade for a long time with (with gas exports contributing an overwhelming amount toward Australian goods exports to Japan). Ms Gornik said other innovation abound, with renewable battery development and precious minerals available in WA, and other alternative energy supplies (including Hydrogen) being explored. She said, because of this innovation happening, renewable energy resources offered a big investment opportunity in WA.

    After guests were treated to Allpress coffee and METoA Café’s pound cake, a panel discussion was held between the state government representatives. The panellists discussed newly emerging business opportunities in Australia for Japanese companies. The discussion topics ranged from renewable energy sources and ‘clean-tech’, ICT and creative industries, the drug test market options and collaboration with Australian universities and academics, to high-tech in the agricultural industry. The attendees were interested in Federal Government support, and it was noted that both the Australian ruling, and opposition parties have agreed to provide funding for renewable energy industries, such as hydrogen. A Q&A session was held at the end of the panel discussion. Questions were raised surrounding the high employment costs and low unemployment rate in Australia, what types of investment Japanese companies should consider in Australia, and how the government can increase information surrounding Australian education. Panellists stated that efficiency in the workplace, and opportunities to expand into other Asian markets were key advantages of investing in Australian industries.

    The seminar concluded with closing remarks made by Brett Cooper, emphasising once more that collaboration is the key to everything, and that the door to investment in Australia is always open.

    Thank you to SMBC for hosting the seminar.


  • 21 Feb 2019 10:17 AM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)

    On Thursday 14 February, ANZ, together with the Chamber, hosted the second ANZ Economic Outlook Series "HORIZONS" at the Palace Hotel. With over 80 guests, including ANZ employees and clients and Chamber members. The seminar commenced with opening remarks by ANZCCJ Chair, Sally Townsend and ANZ CEO Mitch Mason. Special guest speakers included Richard Yetsenga, ANZ Chief Economist, John Corrin, ANZ Global Head of Loan Syndications and Jeff David, ANZ State Director (QLD, NT & WA), Institutional Property Group.

    The seminar commenced with an insightful presentation on the global economic priorities for 2019 by ANZ Chief Economist, Richard Yetsenga. Richard spoke of the key issues in the global economy which comprised of the slowing down of the global economy, structural demographic issues faced in countries such as China and South Korea, and tariffs initiated by the ongoing trade wars between the US and China. He noted that China is readily slowing down with the working age population falling, as a result, growth is expected to slow down and is shifting towards a consumption economy. He also highlighted that Australia’s economy had a solid run throughout 2018 and that New Zealand was also performing as one of the strongest economies in the world.

    Following Richard’s presentation, a panel discussion was then held between panellists Richard Yetsenga, Jeff David and John Corrin. The panellists discussed the nature of the Australian housing market and the bigger global economy from 2018 leading into 2019. Jeff noted that housing prices in Sydney and Melbourne were still falling, coinciding with a reduction in deposits paid for land. They also said the house market slowdown was due to the lack of availability of credit in the market and the growth of interest in offshore lenders from East Asia, from countries such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea and India. The property market on a global scale is rapidly growing, and green lending is set to grow in Australia and New Zealand which provides a growing opportunity for institutional investors.

    The seminar concluded with a Q&A session, with closing remarks made by ANZ CEO Japan, Mitch Mason thanking everyone in attendance.

    Thank you to ANZ for hosting the seminar, and Palace Hotel for their excellent hospitality.


  • 13 Feb 2019 10:02 AM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)

    On 7 February, the Australian and New Zealand Chamber of Commerce in Japan (ANZCCJ) held its fifth Youth Empowerment Programme (YEP) event with guest representative speakers Tanya Orr (Air New Zealand), Yuichi Hirose (ANZ), Emma Ley (ANZ), Chika Narukawa (ANZ), Yasuo Suzuki (Fonterra), Elizabeth Cox (Macquarie), Kohei Tamura (Rio Tinto) and Andrew Chapman (systemsGo). Over 50 attendees came to hear and talk with Australian and New Zealand companies operating in Japan.

    YEP Chair, Eve Bentley made welcoming remarks to all at the event and introduced the representative speakers for the evening. After the guest speakers briefly introduced themselves, the attendees broke off into their respective allocated groups and had the opportunity to ask questions with the company representatives. The evening concluded with a networking session, in which attendees and speakers engaged to talk about career opportunities and prospects within Australian and New Zealand companies in Japan.

    Two most frequently asked questions during the event were in relation to language skill competency and working culture/environment within the representative’s companies. Many participants were concerned with the companies’ language requirement. To address this one of the speakers mentioned that although it is preferable to be fluent in both English and Japanese, companies are more likely to focus on skills, experience and specific degrees and technical capabilities required for the job. On working culture, the Australian and New Zealand companies were able to find a balance between the office culture back home with the one in Japan, including dealing with overtime, maternity leave and work pressure, although this was something managers needed to keep on top of to encourage a healthy work environment.

    The attendees and speakers enjoyed making connections with a variety of people who participated in the event. The Youth Empowerment Program’s mission is to continue to empower young professionals in Tokyo by helping them to connect with one another and be exposed to the career opportunities in Japan.

    2月7日(木)、第五回Youth Empowerment Program (YEP)が開催された。ニュージーランド航空、オーストラリア・ニュージーランド銀行、フォンテラ、マッコーリー証券会社、リオティント、そしてシステムズゴーと、日本で展開するオーストラリア・ニュージーランド企業計6社が参加した。オーストラリアやニュージーランドと関わるようなキャリア構築を目指す学生・社会人50人ほどが集まり、会場は大いににぎわった。

    初めにYEPの会長イヴ・ベントリーが登壇者及び参加者を歓迎。各企業が簡単に全体に対して事業を紹介し、その後グループに分かれて座談会形式で各企業代表者と参加者の交流が行われた。座談会ののち、30分間ほど自由な交流時間も設けられていた。参加者・登壇者共に、会場内で自由に様々な人と交流を深めていた。

    各企業の事業内容や日本での展開に関する質問・説明の他、語学力や職場の雰囲気なども参加者にとっては非常に気になる話題だった様子。語学力に関しては、無論日本語と英語両方流暢に使いこなせるに越したことはない。しかし語学力よりも専攻や経験、そしてスキルが重視される傾向にあるということもまた事実であるようだ。職場環境については、日本の文化とオーストラリア・ニュージーランドの文化を融合させている会社が多いそう。日本的な働き方に固執することなく、精神的ゆとりを重視したフレキシブルな働き方を積極的に取り入れていることがわかる。

    企業側と参加者とのコネクションはもちろんのこと、参加者同士での交流も活発に行われた。「英語と日本語の両方が飛び交う環境で新たな人脈を広げられた」と満足そうに話してくれた参加者もいた。また企業代表者も「変化の目まぐるしい現代、企業側は若い力を求めている。日本とオーストラリア・ニュージーランドに対して関心のある若者との対話は有意義なものだった」とのこと。

    日本とオーストラリア・ニュージーランドの関係をより一層深めていくためにも、YEPは企業や若者が人脈を広げられる場を今後も多く設けていく予定だ。


  • 25 Jan 2019 11:30 AM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)


    ANZCCJ was delighted to welcome in 2019 at the Hamarikyu Ballroom at Conrad Tokyo. We were honoured to hear from New Zealand Ambassador to Japan, HE Stephen Payton, Deputy Head of Mission at the Australian Embassy Tokyo, Rob Tranter, President of the Australia-Japan Business Cooperation Committee (AJBCC), Sir Rod Eddington, Japan Australia Business Chamber of Commerce (JABCC) Vice Chair, Yorihiko Kojima as well as our own ANZCCJ Chair, Andrew Gauci and ANZCCJ Chair-elect, Sally Townsend. It was also with great pleasure to have Australian Ambassador to Japan, HE Richard Court in attendance on the evening. ANZCCJ Co-Vice Chair Catherine O’Connell did a fantastic job as MC for the evening.

    The Shinennkai brought together people from various business industries and provided the opportunity for new networking prospects with attendees enjoying a selection of top-quality free flow drinks and a delicious buffet with Australian and New Zealand ingredients. Thank you to our ANZCCJ sponsors Conrad Tokyo, Oakwood and Yurikong for their contributions to the night.

    ANZCCJ Chair Andrew Gauci, during his speech, reflected on the Chamber’s successful past year, stating that ANZCCJ’s goal of strengthening the business ties between Australia, New Zealand and Japan for the future has been enhanced. ANZCCJ Chair-elect Sally Townsend introduced herself as the succeeding Chair of the Chamber as of 30 January, speaking of her excitement to the new appointment. New Zealand Ambassador to Japan, HE Stephen Payton spoke of New Zealand’s strategy for the New Zealand-Japan relationship which included, strengthening the political-security partnership, focusing on trade relations, building partnerships in the energy sector, and closer peer-to-peer engagement. Deputy Head of Mission at the Australian Embassy Tokyo, Rob Tranter reinforced that the Chamber and Embassy have been active in promoting sporting events such as the upcoming Rugby World Cup 2019 and Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Sir Rod Eddington AO highlighted the signing of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, which was made possible through the joint efforts of Australian, New Zealand and Japanese cooperation and was proud of this milestone.

    The Chamber would like to thank outgoing Chair, Andrew Gauci who will take up the position of Senior Councillor and warmly welcome our incoming Chair, Sally Townsend who will commence her duties from 30 January 2019.



  • 17 Jan 2019 12:07 PM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)


    The Australia and New Zealand Chamber of Commerce in Japan and the Australian Embassy Tokyo was delighted to welcome Ashurst, a leading international law firm with a strong Asia-Pacific presence, and Deloitte, a professional services firm, who presented an overview of mergers and acquisitions between Australia and Japan in 2018. The event speakers included:

    • Andrew Gauci, ANZCCJ Chair
    • Brett Cooper, Austrade Senior Trade Commissioner,
    • Natsuko Ogawa, Partner, Ashurst Melbourne
    • Tracy Whiriskey, Partner, Ashurst Tokyo
    • Shin Takenaka, Partner, Deloitte Sydney
    • Yoshi Shinozuka, Manager, Deloitte Tokyo

    The seminar opened with remarks from ANZCCJ Chair, Andrew Gauci. He recognised the importance of Japanese M&A with Australian firms. He reflected that M&A activity was likely to increase in the coming year, and noted the success of deals in 2018 such as Mitsui’s acquisition of AWE, Lifull Co’s acquisition of Mitula Group and Bunka Shutter acquiring ArcPac Garage Doors. He noted that it was key that law firms such as Ashurst, and Chambers of Commerce like ANZCCJ take a key role in providing good advice to Japanese and Australian companies engaged in M&A.

    Following this, Austrade’s Senior Trade Commissioner Brett Cooper reflected on Australia’s economic outlook. He reported that key economic indicators, like wage growth and GDP growth, made Australia an attractive investment environment. He also reflected on some areas for growth in Australia-Japan trading relations. He highlighted Australia’s nascent hydrogen industry, agricultural investment including agtech, asset management and tourism as growth areas for Australia-Japan trade.

    A panel discussion was then held between Ashurst partners, Natsuko Ogawa and Tracy Whiriskey, and Deloitte Partner Shin Takenaka and Manager Yoshi Shinozuka. The panellists reflected on trends in Japan-Australia M&A in 2018. In particular, they highlighted the role the Royal Banking Commission has had on regulatory compliance and corporate governance. There has been greater regulatory scrutiny of deals, including national interest considerations, and an increased need for Japanese companies to make sure M&A targets satisfy competition law. Lastly, the panellists touched on the importance for both Australian and Japanese businesses to invest time and resources in post-merger integration, particularly in understanding each other’s unique business culture.

    The seminar concluded with a Q&A session, accompanied by drinks to welcome the coming year.

    Thank you to Ashurst and Deloitte for hosting the 2018 update, and the speakers for their insights.

     


  • 10 Jan 2019 2:28 PM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)

    The Foundation for Australia-Japan Studies (FAJS) opens its call for expressions of interest for grant support for 2019 on 10 January. This is an opportunity to apply for financial support for collaborative research projects that combine Japanese and Australian university researchers with researchers from industry or government on topics of significance for the Australia-Japan bilateral relationship. Grants are available for many different types of research and will typically be between AUD$50,000 to AUD$150,000 in value.  Please look at the Guidelines for more details about what areas will be supported.  These grants are a valuable opportunity to start up new projects or to extend existing ones with Australian counterparts. Grants can support the exchange of researchers to build lasting links between research teams from diverse organisations. 

    The Foundation’s mission is to encourage collaborations between academic institutions, industry and government in Australia and Japan and to support people who are transforming the bilateral relationship through these partnerships.  One-way FAJS does that is through the project grant program. The Guidelines explaining the criteria for projects can be found at the Foundation’s website https://www.fajs.org. FAJS are keen to support research collaborations between excellent institutions in Australia and Japan and hope to reach a wide range of potential research partners. 

    The expression of interest is a simple online process with very little paperwork. After initial assessment, the Foundation will invite selected projects to go to the next stage of submitting full applications. The EOI process for the projects opens on January 10 and closes on January 31.  The link to the online application process will be posted on the Foundation website www.fajs.org on January 10. After initial assessment invitations to submit full applications will be sent to selected applicants on February 15.

    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

     日豪研究交流基金(FAJS)は、2019110日に助成金プロジェクトの募集を開始いたします。これは、日本とオーストラリアの大学の研究者が、両国関係に重要なテーマについて、産業界または政府機関の研究者と連携して共同研究プロジェクトを行うための資金を提供するプログラムです。助成金は多様な研究に利用でき、助成額は50,000150,000オーストラリアドルを予定しています。助成金は、オーストラリアのパートナーとの新プロジェクトの立ち上げや、既存のプロジェクトを発展させるための貴重な機会を提供いたします。また、様々な機関の研究チームが持続的な関係を構築できるよう、研究者同士の交流を支援いたします。

    本財団は、日本とオーストラリアの産学官連携を促進し、これらのパートナーシップを通じて、日豪両国関係の発展に寄与する人々への支援をミッションに掲げています。その一つのアプローチとして、FAJSはプロジェクト助成プログラムを実施しています。私たちは、日本とオーストラリアの優秀な機関における共同研究を支援し、幅広い潜在的研究パートナーシップが構築されることに期待を寄せています。

    プロジェクトの基準を説明するガイドラインは、FAJSのウェブサイトhttps://www.fajs.orgに掲載されています。ガイドラインの全文は、https://www.dropbox.com/s/o2lz2e05plbo1at/FAJS%20Grant%20Guidelines%202018.pdf?dl=0 から入手できます。

    応募については、簡単な申請手続きをオンライン上で行っていただくだけです。FAJSの一次審査を通過したプロジェクトには、次の二次審査に進むにあたり、正式な申請書を提出していただきます。Expression of Interest (EOI) Application Formによる一次申請受付期間は、110日から131日までとなっております。オンライン申請のリンクは、110日にFAJSのホームページwww.fajs.orgに掲載されます。二次審査については215日にご案内いたします。


  • 20 Dec 2018 2:00 PM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)

    On 17 December, the Australian Embassy together with JETRO and ANZCCJ held a seminar on the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership at the Embassy. The Australian Ambassador to Japan, HE Richard Court and the Secretary of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), Frances Adamson kicked off the session, before passing the mic over to First Secretary, Emily Flahive (a prior CPTPP negotiator) to provide an outline of the CPTPP agreement.


    From left: Adam Coin, Australian Embassy Tokyo; Tadayuki Nakashima, JETRO; Cheryl Stanilewicz, Austrade and Tim Barnstable, Saputo Dairy.

    This was followed by a panel discussion which included ANZCCJ Food and Agriculture Committee Chair, Tim Barnstable from Saputo Dairy, along with the Chief Senior Researcher at JETRO Tadayuki Nagashima, and Australian Embassy Trade Commissioner and Counsellor (Commercial) Cheryl Stanilewicz, moderated by Australian Embassy Trade & Economic Counsellor Adam Coin. The panel discussion and question and answer time was eye opening, and we’ve summarised the top 7 key things for you to know below:

    1. The CPTPP will enter into force on 30 December 2018 for 6 countries – Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico and Singapore. For Vietnam, the agreement will apply from mid-January 2019. The remaining 4 countries (Brunei, Chile, Malaysia and Peru) still need to ratify the deal in their domestic legislatures. Once they do, the CPTPP will take effect for those countries within 60 days

    2. The CPTPP will eventually eliminate more than 98% of tariffs between CPTPP countries.

    3. Countries in the CPTPP zone account for 23.9% of Australia’s total good exports, 22.5% of Australia’s service exports and 15.6% of the total stock of Australian foreign investment.

    4. Unlike JAEPA, the CPTPP allows producers to self-produce a certificate of origin for export making it a lot easier for exporters

    5. Some specific highlights for the Japan market include:

    • Reductions in Japanese tariffs on Australian beef to 9% within 15 years (currently 18% under JAEPA).
    • Horticulture tariff reductions in areas like table grapes, where CPTPP will bring the tariffs down to 0%.
    • Elimination of the 29.8% tariff on most bulk cheese over 15 years.
    • Tariff reductions and new access for cereal and grains exporters into Japan.
    • Cotton will come into Japan without tariffs, and with Viet Nam as a CPTPP party, third-country manufacturing possibilities open up.
    • Honey into Japan will have its tariff of 25.5% removed over eight years with no quotas 
    • Greater dairy access with quotas established for butter, skim milk powder, condensed milk, among others. 
    • Frozen yogurt, which currently has a duty of 26.3%, has been reduced to 13.15% over ten years, with quota volume restrictions under JAEPA, but under CPTPP the tariff will move to 0% in ten years with no restrictions on volume.
    • Tariffs will be eliminated on bottle wine in 2021 and on bulk wine at entry into force. The tariffs on bottle wine under the EU EPA will be eliminated at entry info force. 
    6. Exporters can choose whether to use JAEPA or CPTPP, but one agreement should be chosen. To check which FTA is best for your business, DFAT have a handy online tool here: https://ftaportal.dfat.gov.au/.

    With the first round of tariff cuts to take place on 30 December 2018, Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) has released information on the application processes for importing products subject to tariff rate quotas (TRQs) under the CPTPP.  Further information can be found in Japanese here: http://www.maff.go.jp/j/kokusai/boueki/tpp/06/01/02/2018kohyo.html.

    For further information on the CPTPP:

      For Australian businesses, information on the CPTPP can be found here.  For enquiries, please contact: tpp@dfat.gov.au

     For New Zealand businesses, information on the CPTPP can be found here.  For enquiries, please contact: cptpp@mfat.govt.nz


  • 14 Dec 2018 3:56 PM | ANZCCJ (Administrator)


    Rugby Alliance

    The Rugby Alliance 'Joint Chambers of Commerce in Japan Rugby Alliance' was launched in Tokyo on 19 September, 2018 at a special Joint-Chamber “RWC 2019 - One Year to Go” event.

    The Alliance is comprised of 8 international Chambers of Commerce in Japan, who have national teams participating in the Rugby World Cup 2019 tournament. With the first game kicking off on 20 September 2019, the RWC 2019 will provide fantastic opportunities for local communities and businesses across Japan. This has already been indicated by the unprecedented international interest in ticket sales. 

    Rugby Alliance Mission Statement:

    "Support Japan’s delivery of the 2019 Rugby World Cup, fostering a legacy of more inclusive communities and embracing opportunities for international business and exchange."

    Rugby Alliance Pledge:

    To:

    • Exchange knowledge of best practices;

    • Compile and share a master calendar of events; and

    • Channel combined resources into the delivery of three co-hosted events. 

    Choosing a Logo

    The Rugby Alliance now requires a logo to use at events and across communication channels. The logo should symbolise strength and solidarity, whilst recognising the driving forces of the RWC2019 and Chambers of Commerce.

    Please review the following draft logo designs (A-F) and cast your vote, recognising your top 3 in order. The logo which gains the highest number of votes will be announced on January 10, 2019. To understand more about the thought behind the designs, a description of each logo can be found here.

    Vote here for your favourite logo!
     


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